UPCOMING TALKS

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ACCESS TO WEALTH: SYSTEMIC RACISM DISCUSSION SERIES

October 15, 2020

Why is there a racial wealth gap in our country?

Black and African American families have a far lower percentage of wealth than white families in America. Even as the percentage of Black and African American college graduates increase, this wealth gap still persists. During this discussion, we will explore how systemic and racist policies have affected wealth building in Black communities for generations and still affect the financial growth and stability of communities today.  

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VIRTUAL LECTURE SLAVERY AND RACIAL CAPITALISM IN AMERICA

October 22, 2020

Join the Virginia Club of New York for a virtual lecture with Professor Justene Hill Edwards on Slavery and Racial Capitalism in America.

The relationship between slavery and the rise of capitalism in the United States has become an increasingly popular—and controversial— topic among historians over the past decade. The central question is this: How did slavery, and the labor of enslaved people, contribute to American economic growth between the American Revolution and the Civil War? Moreover, how did the experiences of almost four million enslaved people in the United States on the eve of the Civil War influence the rise of capitalism in America, particularly during the nineteenth century?

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THOMAS JEFFERSON AND WILLIAM SHORT: THE POLITICS OF AFRICAN AMERICAN PROPERTY OWNERSHIP AS FREEDOM

SPONSORED BY THE OSHER LIFETIME LEARNING INSTITUTE AT THE UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA

November 13, 2020

Thomas Jefferson had a complex relationship with his close friend, once-secretary, and career diplomat William Short. One issue over which they never found commonality was slavery. Both Jefferson and Short included slaveholding in their financial portfolios, but it was Short who made good on his philanthropic goals of divesting himself from slavery. And over Short's lifetime, his ideas about slavery evolved. Perhaps his evolved perspective on slavery and people of African descent, one that differed from Jefferson's, influenced Short's decision to make limited visits to Monticello after the 1810's. In particular, Jefferson and Short held different views on the correct path toward slave emancipation, with Short supporting the emancipation of slaves and providing them with land while Jefferson advocated for a more gradual process of emancipation. The perspectives of Thomas Jefferson and William Short illuminate the complicated political history of gradual emancipation and the early republican idea of property ownership as freedom in America.

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Interested in interviewing Justene Hill Edwards? Get in touch.